JerzyP2Saint


Romero, By Giobanny Ascencio y Raul Lemus- Grupo Cinteupiltzin CENAR El Salvador (Mural pintado con acrílico y óleos) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY-SA 2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Upcoming Romero beatification “providential”

On Tuesday March 11, 2015 Pope Francis approved the decree for martyrdom for Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero.

Romero was murdered while celebrating mass on March 24, 1980. By approving the decree this clears the path for Romero for beatification. The beatification is scheduled to be an outdoor mass on May 23, 2015.
“This will be a moment treasured not only for Salvadorians, but for Catholics worldwide. The ceremony will be in Plaza Divino Salvador del Mundo, Italian Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia, the chief promoter of the archbishop’s sainthood cause, said at a news conference Wednesday in San Salvador.”

The normal process of beatification requires the presence of a verified miracle. This is not the case for those martyred for their faith. Pope Frances appears to be fast tracking Romero through this process. Romero has been considered a saint by the Salvadorian people for years.


Janek Skarzynski, AFP/File, murder, news, nuns

News:Op-Ed: Murder of Polish priest may offer clues in Boris Nemtsov’s case

Authoritarian, corrupt or rogue regimes, their leaders, and their beneficiaries often behave in similar ways in different countries. They fear their democratic opponents and rely on the secret police to keep themselves in power through monitoring, intimidating, jailing and sometimes killing those who may challenge their repressive rule. Although Poland of the 1980s and today’s Russia are not exactly alike, there may be enough similarities worth exploring between the 1984 murder of a Catholic priest in Poland and the assassination of Russian opposition leader and former Deputy Prime Minister Boris Nemtsov in Moscow last week.


Road to Sainthood Begins 1

Father Jerzy Popieluszko gave his life to serve the people of Poland. In doing so he started to change the world one sermon at a time. We will be chronicling the journey of Father Jerzy on this site. You will be taken on a journey over the next coming years that will revel in history. At the same time the content of the words Father Jerzy spoke over thirty years ago are still as relevant today.

We invite you to travel down his road to sainthood with us. There will be content not found anywhere else that will give you a living version of his life. There will be video footage of his sermons, pictures that will exemplify the life of this humble and willing servant. Occasionally we will have guest bloggers, first person experience interviews and more. This site will become the diary of blessed Father Jerzy as he continues his journey.

If you have a personal experience with Father Jerzy, or something you would like to share about how he impacted you. We invite you to contact us and we will do our part to help share your story. Unlike many other historical sites, this one is interactive. We welcome your comments, prayers and believe that it will add to the memory of Father Jerzy.

Many may not be aware of the story of Father Jerzy, and how in four short years he changed the world. By opening up the vaults and sharing his walk of faith, we believe he will continue to change the world after his death. He has been beatified by the Vatican and is on his way to becoming a saint. Over the next couple of years there will be some really exciting things happening regarding Father Jerzy. You will not want to miss out on the unique experience of walking the path alongside. He was a Beloved Priest, a Political Prophet, and a Martyr of Gospel Nonviolence. Father Jerzy’s Road to Sainthood will show you how and why.


February 28 1982 1

[opening remarks] Holy Mass for the Fatherland on February 28 1982 was celebrated by Fr. Jerzy Popieluszko. In place of the homily he read to the congregation in the Church of St. Stanislaus Kostka the Declaration of Polish Bishops.

We gather in the name of Jesus Christ. We gather to place our prayers at Christ’s altar and with them everything that we are experiencing, at this moment, in the life of our Nation. We especially include in our prayers those whom the martial law has touched most painfully. We take in all those deprived of their freedom, those arrested, retained, deprived of work, and their families. We also include all those who serve the injustice and the lies.

[declarations of Polish Bishops and the Primate]

The Church always stands on the side of truth. The Church is always on the side of those who are harmed. Today, the Church stands on the side of those who have been deprived of freedom, whose consciences are being attacked. The Church stands today on the side of workers’ solidarity, on the side of working people who are frequently put into the same category as criminals. On December 15th, last year, Polish Bishops said the following ¹”

Chief Episcopal Council of Poland gathering in the time of martial law, based on the available information of the situation in Poland – directs to the faithful of Catholic Church, words of support, unity and brotherly sympathy. Our pain of the entire nation terrorized by military power. Many members of the union movement have been interned. Interment is widening and affecting workers as well as people of culture and learning and students. (…) The uncertainty and impotence of the working world causes increased emotions, bitterness and hate, to the point of determination. (…) The dramatic decision of the authorities to impose martial law on our country is a blow to the expectations and hopes that, through nation-wide understanding, one can resolve the existing problems of our country. (…) We wish the Church and the people to concentrate on the following goals.

The release of those interned and establishing for them acceptable living conditions. We are aware of many cases of abused, of placing people without warm closing in freezing quarters.
The re-activation of labor unions, especially “Solidarity”, as per their statutes, and this includes the enabling the Leader and the Committee to function freely. The union “Solidarity” which defends the rights of working people is vital to the return of equilibrium in public life…
And on January 6 of the current year (1982) on the day of the Epiphany of Our Lord, the Primate said: